FAQ – System

  • How big should my heating and cooling system be?
  • Is a system with more capacity better?
  • How long should my system run in a cycle?

How big should my heating and cooling system be?

Sizing of your heating and cooling systems is completely dependent on your individual home, insulation levels, climate and construction type. It can vary greatly from old leaky houses to newer, energy efficient houses. Your system should be just big enough to heat and cool your home, but not too oversized because of the increased operating costs that larger systems will have. The best way to truly know how big your system should be is to hire a licensed professional to come calculate your heat loss based off of insulation, construction type, and more. This general estimate is known as a home’s “heat loss”, or how much heat a house will lose, and therefore how much heat will be required from your heating system.

Is a system with more capacity better?

Not at all. A larger system will cost much more to operate, and will be constantly cycled on and off. The air conditioner is least efficient on first starting up, so a large system will cost more money on those short start ups.

How long should my system run in a cycle?

The length of each cycle will completely depend on your home, system and weather conditions outside. Ideally, the heating and cooling units are sized to constantly condition the space during worse case conditions. Heaters ideally would put heat into your home as fast as it loses it during a -20 F day with wind. Air Conditioners will put cold air into the house as fast as it would lose it on an 110 F day. The farther away from those extremes you are, the more smaller cycles the unit will go through to tweak the comfort level in the home. Obviously your heater will have to run less on a 50 degree day than a 20 degree day because of the amount of heat the house is losing.